The EU Referendum 2016

Posted on May 3, 2016

Arguments for and against Brexit are gaining pace ahead of the national EU Referendum on June 23rd 2016, consideration needs to be given to employers across Cumbria, Southwest Scotland and UK, the effect on them, and the knock on effect on UK Human Resources Departments and the Recruitment Industry. Whichever way the EU referendum goes, it will have consequences for employers across Cumbria and Southwest Scotland.

Do you know how the EU Referendum will affect your business?

The UK’s Employment Law landscape will look enormously different without the direct influence and implications of being part of the EU. The main Employment Law areas covered by EU legislation include:

  • Equality Act 2010 – the EU is largely responsible for bringing the UK fully in line with the rest of the Western World when it comes to discrimination. The Equality Act protects individuals from discrimination on the grounds of sex, race, religion, belief, disability, age, sexual orientation and gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnerships. This Act has made the workplace one that is fairer, and brings in valuable talent previously overlooked due to discrimination.
  • Agency Workers Regulations 2010 – these regulations give Agency workers in the UK the right to equal treatment as that of their permanent counterparts. This obviously has a knock on effect for Recruitment Agencies looking to fill temporary agency positions.
  • Part Time Employees (Prevention of Less Favourable Treatment) Regulations 2000 – regulations to ensure that part-time employees’ employment rights are protected enabling UK businesses to benefit from more flexible working patters, especially making it possible to make the best possible business use of women returning to work after having children, bolstering the economy overall.
  • Working Time Regulations 1998 – whilst the UK negotiated various Opt-Outs and Exemptions, the UK is still largely subject to the weekly maximum hours, rest break and holiday entitlements, as dictated by the EU. One of the key reasons the UK negotiated the Opt-Outs and Exemptions was precisely because of UK business concern that such restrictions would hinder UK businesses, damage their profitability, and make working environments too restrictive. However, we were able to negotiate the Opt-Outs, and long-term our competitive edge hasn’t been affected.